T O P
dustdabomb

Watch your air and dont be that guy who lets everyone in your crew know at the last min your low. If you dont know or arent comfortable doing somthing dont do it and ask to train if your fresh out of rookie school it dosnt mean your a pro, it could save you, your crew, or patients life.


rakfocus

They sent out the review for the LACoFD incident that killed a firefighter earlier this year and the guy had sucked down his 45min bottle in 16 minutes to alarm. Turns out that the estimate they were using was inaccurate to full overhaul conditions and that this was somewhat normal. So at 50% you are supposed to leave and come back with a new bottle - at alarm that is for emergencies only


Jamooser

Don't you guys have low air alarms on your packs? Our bells go off when we're at 25%.


dustdabomb

You cant always rely on your low air alarm if your in a warehouse and you too deep and go past your halfway mark on your pack its time to turn around low air alarm or not.


krixlp

over here teaching is double the air for the way back. so (assuming an effective on-air time of 30min) you have 10min to walk/crawl to the fire before you have to turn back and for every minute you are faster you gain 3 min of "work"-time (assuming constant air consumption)


osprey413

And I think NFPA standard for new air packs is 33% now.


[deleted]

Yep, our G1s go off at 33%


TacticalRoomba

5500 PSI for Scott 5.5 packs, goes off at 2k


rnov8tr

Was just going to 33 percent and the the 2nd stage comes on 10 percent or so?


cjb211

You should be out of the building or well on your way out before that alarm goes off. In the academy we were told that the air after that alarm is not your air to use. That air is your family’s, your friend’s, your squad’s, so don’t use it.


salsa_verde_doritos

Depends on the type of building, but, yeah.


Buckeye3353

I was always told 1/3 is for your Cheif/ 1/3 is for you or the person your saving / 1/3 is for your family.


g_thang87

✔️


ChevronSevenDeferred

Driving. Being first or fast isn't as important as your own safety.


Rentiak

Never put your back towards traffic even if it looks stupid walking backwards to wherever is safe


javaWithExtraScript

Yes the biggest danger I have faced are drivers when controlling traffic


durhap

Obesity. Keep yourself fit. Think of how many firefighters die hours after the call.


SkibDen

Cancer. Cancer. Cancer. Also, don't jump out of the fucking truck.. No it might not hurt you now, but in 10 years your knees are done.


Groverjay87

This month my lieutenant is forced to retire early due to knees from an injury getting off truck and a firefighter on the same truck is done for for with stage 4 cancer. Been a hell of a month. Both guys had a lot of time to go but are done. Sucks. Be smart.


drewbooooo

I’m 28 been doing it for 7 years and my knees are taking a toll. Working to build them up again and now getting out of the truck one toe at a time


physco219

I hope it's not too late...best wishes!


Groverjay87

This month my lieutenant is forced to retire early due to knees from an injury getting off truck and a firefighter on the same truck is done for for with stage 4 cancer. Been a hell of a month. Both guys had a lot of time to go but are done. Sucks. Be smart.


Groverjay87

This month my lieutenant is forced to retire early due to knees from an injury getting off truck and a firefighter on the same truck is done for for with stage 4 cancer. Been a hell of a month. Both guys had a lot of time to go but are done. Sucks. Be smart.


unique_username_384

Carefully climbing down from the truck with 3 points of contact is not cool. Do it anyway. Falling off the truck is our leading cause of accidents with injuries


Bulawa

There's more danger in getting out l Than you think. Like the guy who thought I was going out the other door and slammed the door in my face 🤕


Jamooser

I always say "coming out your side" for this very reason.


past_is_prologue

Even just stepping out of the engine. I went ass over teakettle on a patch of ice last winter climbing out of the engine.


physco219

Hope you didnt get busted up too badly and if you did you have made a full recovery!


past_is_prologue

Just hurt my pride, fortunately.


Dat_White_Boy_Willy

I did the same thing! Hurt my watch and my pride!


OSUCOWBOY1129

3 am structure call, active fire showing, I was barely awake, missed the top step while in full gear, hit flat about 6 feet below... damn near couldn't breathe the entirety of the call. Took about two weeks for my back and sternum to feel better. I am Slow Joe getting out of the truck in full gear now. Slow is fast, fast is slow. Had to learn it the hard way.


Outofstockgrocery

I believe the saying is slow is smooth, smooth is fast.


OSUCOWBOY1129

That makes sense. We have an older guy that helps out with classroom training who always says "Slow is Fast, Fast is Slow." TIL that I've been repeating an incorrect saying for years.


physco219

I can confirm our chief and deputy chief both used the "slow is fast and fast is slow" sometimes they would change it up some and it would be something like "slow is better and fast is dead (or fast gets dead first)."


exgiexpcv

Ehh, I think it works either way, you're fine.


Mackerelly

My Wildfire crew boss would say " slow is smooth, smooth is safe, safe is fast."


Seeker-of-truth1

I am very deliberate when I climb off the engine. I first look both ways so a car doesn’t take off the door, and I use three points of contact stepping off. I will not be a statistic there!


natrom3369

Getting back from a fire alarm I slipped getting out of a commercial cab engine and landed on my back and elbow, ended up fracturing part of radial head. Definitely learned my lesson on keeping three points of contact when getting in and out of the truck


TLunchFTW

I've slipped a few times coming out of the cab. Pulled my shoulder a bit, but that third point of contact saved me.


tubarizzle

I've been on the job 6 months. I've almost fallen out of the truck on several occasions and was only saved by the 3 points of contact rule.


Dannyfiremanny

Fire fighter died in 2019 falling out out of the truck and then being struck by a vehicle.


physco219

Damn. Know where?


Dannyfiremanny

San Antonio.


cute-donkey

And look both ways. Getting hit by a car is a real risk.


physco219

"Look both ways and look again!" \~My father This has saved me more than once.


Mr_Slipp3ry

I agree. In reality, working accidents on highway is probably the most dangerous thing we do.


Never-mongo

Not only that but hopping down messes with your knees way more than you’d think


physco219

We were taught the 3 points of contact is for trucks and ladders. If you have a tool secure it and still have the 3 points.


djernie

* Most common injury is falling down from some height; * Also, when we spray the place with water, it can become slippery; * And watch every step, there will be hoses everywhere to trip over; Conclusion: don't take shortcuts and always wear your PPE properly (no loose helmet straps etc...)


Bulawa

We are vollies, so (I guess) the range of abilities and confidence within the company is huge. So we are big on telling people to refuse orders that they think they cannot handle. I have never yet seen someone actually do it on a call. Asking the guy who gives the order if he's sure about ordering that specific person to do that thing, yes. But we know eachother pretty well, so orders come according to ability most of the time anyway.


OSUCOWBOY1129

I think the assumption that all volunteers, particularly Probies, know what you're ordering them to do on a fire ground is a dangerous one. I don't know if I have ever seen a new FF ask for clarification when tasked with something, even if they have 0 idea what that task is that they were just assigned. It's dangerous for everyone involved sometimes. Volunteer staffing issues usually mean that one-on-one oversight is minimal, but tying a new guy to the hip of an experienced FF for several months is vital. We even see a massive discrepancy between local departments when working aid together for large scenes. Departmental cross-training in rural areas is also a very important, often overlooked training task. Learning what people carry on their trucks, learning what their engines are capable of, etc.


From_Gaming_w_Love

Traffic control is one of the most dangerous duties at an mvc- yet rookies end up being tasked with it a lot. Stand out there like everyone approaching the scene wants to kill you…head on a swivel- never turn your back on approaching traffic.


unique_username_384

I'm going to approach traffic control differently now. Thank you for sharing


a4hope

Came here to say this....never dismiss being on traffic control as "lame" or "boring" because it's probably the job that's going to save your people's lives.


krixlp

One thing that someone more experienced told me is that if in doubt block the entire road/intersection. if you just block it (properly) you wont have to deal with traffic and its ok to block more than we actually need in the beginning, if we see we blocked off too much later on we still can safely open up a little (more) but if we blocked off too little thats an immediate potential danger. And just let the police handle that if possible.


labmansteve

I’d say it’s just how quickly things can happen. When you’re new, there is a perception that you will have time to react to things. This is often not the case, instead you must rely on situational awareness and planning to ensure you don’t end up in the wrong place when the bad thing happens. Regardless of the call type, location, or your perception of how bad it is… always ALWAYS have eyes in the back of your head. Also, if you think the general population can be dumb, just wait until you put them in a situation they have no idea how to address. They can be 100% unpredictable and do the most bizarre things.


ughhhh_accounting

Not just for the rookies but also the older guys in our department- people just can't get this one through their heads, but during *Overhaul* stay on air until the environment is safe. Just cause the fire is out doesn't mean it is safe to breath the air. Also we have giant fans and other tools for ventilation, we don't need to inhale all the smoke and drywall to clear the home out.


Brendone33

For any department where you respond from home, getting into a motor vehicle collision on your way to the station is potentially the riskiest part of the call. Take care of your health and physical fitness, more firefighters die of a heart attack on the job than anything else.


RaymondLuxury-Yacht

***Wear your seat belt.*** Stop at red lights, even if you're going lights and sirens. Never be afraid to speak up if you see something unsafe. Don't take for granted that what you've been told to do is going to be safe. For example, if you're told to break a window by the chief, make sure you're still evaluating the situation to make sure you're not about to cause a backdraft in an oxygen-starved room. Soot on your gear looks cool but is full of nasty shit that can give you serious health effects later, so wash it. **Seriously, wear your seat belt.**


Uniform_Restorer

You know, I think he wants me to not wear my seatbelt…


VF79

Be on Air, doesn’t matter if others aren’t. If there’s smoke, there’s particulates. Especially vehicle fires. Literally the only thing that can burn are full of chemicals.


DO_initinthewoods

If you can smell it, it's in the air and your lungs


VF79

Even if you can’t smell it.


physco219

Happy Cake day!


ThisIsFlight

Use the handles on the rig, thats what theyre there for. Do not hold, repeat, **DO NOT** use door thresholds to balance yourself. Getting your fingers crushed in those heavy ass doors is **NOT** fun.


Bluemonkey112

Never become complacent. In every career, not just firefighting, people become complacent because it’s the something they do so often, they get relaxed, let there guard down, shrug off some safety things, training, and that’s when the bad things happen. You may go to 10 alarm calls a day that are all false, but that 11th could be the real deal. Be ready for it. Totally different point - Mental Health - individuals need to know that it’s okay to not be okay. Nobody needs to be the tough macho guy or gal, nobody needs to shrug off a bad call, speak up, talk, and it’s okay to need some help. You may be able to tuck it away now, but someday it’ll pop up again. I know at our department we’re very open, but I’m sure there’s still some that aren’t. It’s okay to not be okay.


TACTICALsnakez

Don’t get tunnel vision. Look at scene safety. Power lines, window mounted ac units, brick façades, apposing traffic, animals, and other humans. All can be a risk and it’s better to identify them before they become said risk


alienmegaship

Training is just as dangerous and should be treated as such.


Adorable-Storm-3143

Never ever put an old pen in your mouth. Gross!


CleavelandCreamer

Securing ground ladders, specifically on concrete like driveways or sidewalks. It’s easy to bang a ladder in the grass, throw it then do the classic “first rung jump” to make sure it doesn’t go anywhere. But my hill to die on (potentially literally) is when people bang a ladder on a sidewalk or driveway, then run off as usual without securing it so it doesn’t slide out when a fireman or victim tries to bail out, or when a hero without a battle buddy tries to go up and make a grab. When you’re doing ground ladder ops on cement or a like material, PLEASE make sure your ladder isn’t going to give out on you. Weather that means someone footing it, the first rung jump, or tying it off at the top or bottom, just something so you don’t explode your spine over your SCBA.


dpo466321

Wash your fucking hands and shower! I'm only 5 years into this (volly) and nearly every class I've taken stresses cancer prevention to some degree.


Jay911

My department, a few years ago, did a review of all the possible skills and abilities you might use on an emergency incident and discovered that the two skills we use the absolute most, on every incident, were two of the skills we least trained upon: Driving and using a radio effectively.


bachfrog

Electricity can and will kill you


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


Guilty_Assignment_25

The number one cause of death for firefighters is heart attacks. Even if 80% of your calls are meemaw with toe pain, that other 20% is some real shit that goes 0 to 100 quick, then back down until it's time to go 100 again. Doing that over and over puts *a lot* of strain on your heart. You will have food shoved in your face, and probably not train enough as is. Especially if you're a volley. Hitting the gym and do conditioning regularly is fucking important and may save your life.


DanLed17

31 years retired. PTSD


OkFinding6961

Still a rookie myself but learned not to rush, yeah adrenaline may be going Mach jesus but slow and steady wins and always think about all the possibilities


DO_initinthewoods

99% of the time there is NO RUSH. Slow the f*** down with everything! Take a few extra seconds to look and slow down at intersections while driving, carefully sizing up, take a few deep breaths to meticulously don your mask, taking your time while inside to keep check where you are and the conditions....Yes things happen fast, but slower than you think. This especially important for rooks and many vollies (read: me).


narcandistributor

Freeway calls


Groverjay87

Backing into my station is scary. We need to stop 4 lanes of traffic to do so. So many near misses. Going to happen some day. Ship ins are always at risk because their head is not on a swivel like ours.


fender1878

Wash your gear! Dirty turnouts and helmets aren’t cool anymore. Getting cancer isn’t cool. Why would you want all those carcinogens to be in and around your body every shift? After a fire, throw your turnouts in trash bags and place them in an outside compartment. When you get back to the station, immediately hop in the shower. Throw your gear in the extractor and get it cleaned. Wash your uniforms and tshirts at work. Don’t bring that junk home to wash in your personnel wash and drier. Your family doesn’t need the exposure. Diesel exhaust is one of the biggest killers and most often leads to colon cancer. Do what you can to get exhaust systems in your stations. If you can’t, keep the trucks outside on the ramp during business hours to try and limit the exposure.


drewbooooo

Do not blow through red lights. This isn’t Hollywood. You should stop at every light, I know it’s almost impossible during legit emergencies but at least slow to a speed where u can stop on a dime when going through a red light. My buddy lost his job making this mistake and cost his dept millions in damages


drunk_catcher

Mental Health is important.


theremotebroke

Staying hydrated. Not just water, electrolytes and all. It's summer and beyond the heat of fire, the ambient temp can be dangerous too especially if you're in gear. Know your limits and keep yourself in check. You're no good to anyone if you passout.


Ding-Chavez

This is a little late. Don’t mess around with co workers/married people/ subordinates/ the new EMT or anyone else that’s going to get you in trouble. I’ve seen more people lose rank or their job because they’re messing around somewhere or with someone they shouldn’t than ever got hurt on a call. Be smart about it. You can have a thriving relationship with someone in the department, but you can also bury yourself for a one night stand.


Dannyfiremanny

Stay off social media, stop posting reason for you to get fired. Also, when you have to go around the other side of a truck on a wreck check around the vehicle before you go.


Dannyfiremanny

Why are there like 5 repeat answers for every comment.


RoverRebellion

Wear your PPE. Ignore the tough guys, and in fact, go out of your way to clown them. They will be the ones to an early grave for being too cool to wear air during overhaul or IDLH environments. They will be the ones who say it will never be them. They will be the ones who try to lead you to an early grave.


ElectricOutboards

Protect your eyes. Protect your crew’s eyes. If there’s one thing I would make a requirement for certification, it’s a class on the importance of protecting your eyes.


LeadDispensary

Legal and ethical considerations. Anything you do, can and will get you in trouble. Including nothing.


Davidtgnome

Treat all flooded basements like they have an outlet underwater and that someone defeated the breaker or fuse. Treat each and every vehicle you see while directing like they are trying to kill you. Every single patient you treat will sue you and own your house if you make a mistake. We save lives but protect property, do not risk your life for property. Old timers will criticize you for this. However in the 20 ish years I've been doing this fires, have gotten hotter, smokier and construction has become less tolerant of fire load and water load. It's ok to be aggressive, it's not ok to be dead. It's perfectly reasonable to get a knock from the yard and then go in to mop up. The people who tell you otherwise are generally reliving the stupid days, or looking to wind up on memorial


Jakee4599

Don’t act like you know how to do something because you should’ve learned in the fire academy then when told to do something, you can’t. I have NO problem teaching a new guy how to do something even as simple as changing an air bottle when they’re freshly hired. But when I try to teach something and you say “I know” then when the time comes you DONT know I’ll be pissed.


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


TrueMoods

For volunteers: Don't rush to the station like a maniac. I still have a 5 inch scar on my arm from losing to glass made front door.


CalFireFighter

Situational Awareness. In all aspects


sirjacobrowan

Always sound the floor. Also I think that ladders in general are most likely to cause career-ending injuries.


Shullski73

Ems calls are just as dangerous as fire calls


edgarsilvercreek

Working car wrecks and dealing with cars driving by


Mile-High-Mayham

Electricity!


cg1984285

Tunnel vision


physco219

Haz/Mat situations are best left to the Haz/Mat crews or those specially trained for. Let them deal with it. We were taught the thumb rule. If you pull up to an Haz/Mat scene and you can hold up your thumb at arm's length and you can still see any of the scene you are too close.


OP-PO7

Be aware of Flow Paths. Think about what's going to happen before you start breaking the windows. You can't unbreak them, and if you're doing it wrong you will pull the fire on top of you really quickly. Some studies may say you cannot push fire with a handline. These are not absolute, or even accurate depending on who you talk to. There are literally thousands of collective years of experience saying otherwise. Be aware of opposing handlines because you WILL absolutely burn the shit out of people. Sometimes a 2.5" handline is the correct choice for interior attack. Cockloft and attic fires in older stick construction, as well as basement fires being a couple examples. Train in deploying and maneuvering it inside a building. Big fire, Big water. Be aware of smoke. Old timers used to call black smoke unburned fire, and they're right. All fuel rich smoke needs is the right balance to kick off, and then you're burning. "The danger zone for being new, is not when you're new. It's when you've got enough time on to think you know something, but not enough time to realize you don't really know anything." Be aware of metal fences and gates you have to go through. The power service could be burned through and laying on it around the corner.


Dannyfiremanny

So the thing is when it comes to pushing fire, you cant, BUT fog nozzles do produce a lot of airflow and THAT can push air into the fire but iv never seen it push a whole ass fire into another room.


VF79

Be on Air, doesn’t matter if others aren’t. If there’s smoke, there’s particulates. Especially vehicle fires. Literally the only thing that can burn are full of chemicals.


asphaultSlidejobs

Keep your helmet on from the time you get off the truck until you get back on. Things fall out of the fire building, off the raised ladders and off the tops of the engine. Accidents happen and injuries can be prevented


alienmegaship

Training is just as dangerous and should be treated as such.


TheOverlord15

Keep your head on swivel. Stay highly alert to your surroundings and mind where you step. Look above as well, power lines get overlooked often in the first few min upon arrival.


fyxxer32

Firetrucks are big heavy vehicles. They can kill people if you run into things. Even you and the guys on your crew. Once upon a time I thought I was invulnerable until I lost a friend in an accident on a response. There may be a time when a car pulls in front of you and you may have to hit them instead of swerving and hitting that big oak tree. Drive defensively , stop to clear intersections, don't out drive your brakes. NEVER get in a hurry backing up. Use a spotter. Seat belts are your friend.


Dry_Incident_5055

Your physical fitness level. Keep it up and especially cardio and hydrate even in the middle of winter. Don't be a hero and take breaks.


azd15

Traffic and standing on the side of the interstate


twozerothreeeight

When you're 22 you feel invincible and take your health for granted. You'll be surprised by how easy it is to injure a joint enough to decrease your quality of life. And once a joint is a little damaged and range of motion is a little decreased injuring it gets easier. And an ankle injury can end up with you having lower back problems cause a stiff ankle leads to a tight calf, leads to a tight hamstring, and etc up the chain. Take care of yourself. Do more cardio than weight lifting. Do yoga/some sort of stretching. Clean your gear as needed. Don't put on 10 pounds a year until ya can't see your dick anymore when ya pee. The on the job deaths are tragic and memorable, but in reality heart attacks and cancer are more likely to get you.


TheBluceRee

Don't take advice from Volunteers. Don't blindly follow aggressive captains. Be sure to mske decisions for yourself if the occasion arises.


Mydingdingdong97

Mentale health


dpo466321

Wash your fucking hands and shower! I'm only 5 years into this (volly) and nearly every class I've taken stresses cancer prevention to some degree.


Groverjay87

Backing into my station is scary. We need to stop 4 lanes of traffic to do so. So many near misses. Going to happen some day. Ship ins are always at risk because their head is not on a swivel like ours.


Groverjay87

Backing into my station is scary. We need to stop 4 lanes of traffic to do so. So many near misses. Going to happen some day. Ship ins are always at risk because their head is not on a swivel like ours.


rakfocus

Have you guys thought about installing a stoplight? Works real well in the places I've seen it


Groverjay87

We have one each way with a red rotary light on top when it’s active. They are old lights on the sidewalk. They are not hung over the road so they are not like a regular intersection. It’s not near an intersection so it’s out of place. so 75% see them and go hey that light is red I wonder what it’s for as they swerve around the truck with people jumping out. 20% stop and slowly creep up until you have to put your body in the way of them. 4% tell you to fuck off for making them stop and 1% do it right lol. I had a box truck not stop. Swerve onto the apron as I blocked all 4 lanes for my crew and proceed to flip me off as he drove away. Gotta love it.


physco219

We had a major roadway that was very high speed. Even tho we had a large driveway to back into sometimes we had to stop traffic. Some years later lights were installed. BEST THING EVER. Sure some still run it but it really buys a lot more time. Wish they had been installed years ago.


Groverjay87

Backing into my station is scary. We need to stop 4 lanes of traffic to do so. So many near misses. Going to happen some day. Ship ins are always at risk because their head is not on a swivel like ours.


dpo466321

Wash your fucking hands and shower! I'm only 5 years into this (volly) and nearly every class I've taken stresses cancer prevention to some degree.


ThisIsFlight

Use the handles on the rig, thats what theyre there for. Do not hold, repeat, **DO NOT** use door thresholds to balance yourself. Getting your fingers crushed in those heavy ass doors is **NOT** fun.


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


TLunchFTW

Don't be afraid to say "I don't know." Bullshitting makes you look like a jackass. In firefighting, you have the added bonus of killing people.


Hefty-Willingness-91

Anything can happen at any time - PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR SURROUNDINGS


Hefty-Willingness-91

Anything can happen at any time - PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR SURROUNDINGS


Calm_Ad_8538

Be careful with any fires within refrigerators and freezers; something to do with chemical used for the cooling unit. In other words don't half-ass with your issued ppe


Dannyfiremanny

It goes boom now.


RentAscout

Every job that involves risk has had preventable deaths due to someone new not saying something when they see something wrong. I don't remember the specifics but a group was killed/hurt when a floor gave out on them. A new guy left the building prior to the collapse without saying anything.


YourHomonym

LARRO


fyxxer32

Oh is that MY bell ringing?


Robdoggz

In my agency we're required to do annual Skills Maintenance Drills to maintain our response capability current. The main one is SMD1, which is a burn over drill, and without it we're not even able to think about getting on a truck. I've recently started moving into the training space, and the two courses I've assisted on have included SMD1 as one of the drills, and the sloppiness I have witnessed from people doing that drill left me despairing for their safety should they ever find their truck overcome by fire. Both courses I got them to run the drill again and again until they actually got it right. As someone who has actually been in a truck that has burned over, SMD1 is something that needs to become muscle memory for every firefighter in the agency. There's no room for lackadaisical nonsense and foot dragging where lives and safety are concerned.


ThisIsFlight

Use the handles on the rig, thats what theyre there for. Do not hold, repeat, **DO NOT** use door thresholds to balance yourself. Getting your fingers crushed in those heavy ass doors is **NOT** fun.